Conference 2019 / Invited Speakers

Donna Quay

Invited Speaker

Title: An Introduction to Organisational Behaviour Management and How You Can Apply It in Your Organisation

Abstract

Many of you work in roles where you use your skills in Applied Behaviour Analysis to make meaningful change in the lives of others. And in spite of dysfunctional systems, perhaps even under performing teams or processes that are followed but not really understood, you still deliver this meaningful service. What if there was a way to bring meaningful change to your organisation using the foundation ABA skills you already have? Join me as I introduce you to the field of Organisational Behaviour Management, a sub-field of Applied Behaviour Analysis and one that is growing very fast and changing organisations for the better. Learn some of the key OBM principles and concepts and get an overview of how to apply these in your organisation and where to get support to do this. As we journey through the concepts of OBM I will share real examples of successes and learnings I have had on my own OBM journey and how these have shaped my career and influeced those around me.

Biography

Donna holds a Masters of Science from the University of Otago in Dunedin New Zealand. After studying Behaviour Based Safety during her Masters, Donna was certain that a career in behaviour change was for her.  Choosing to initially focus on health and safety, Donna delivered OBM improvement projects across multiple sites for a multinational mining company. In addition to this, Donna has been a mentor for the OBM network and a course instructor for Florida Institute of Technology’s OBM Applied! course. Donna now works as a manager, focusing on safety leadership and culture development for an electricity distribution company in New Zealand.

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Jeffery Chan, Ph.D.

Invited Speaker

Title:The UN CRPD (2006): Implications for behaviour support practitioners and clinical practice

Abstract

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)  (2006) is a landmark international treaty that Australia has ratified in July 2008 and the Optional Protocol in 2009. The CRPD is significant in the way we are now required to change the way we think, work with and support people with disabilities; particularly those you present with behaviours of concern. The CRPD particularly challenges some of the old and current practices of applied behaviour analysis. This presentation will highlight the key elements of the CRPD and the implications of the CRPD in clinical practice, particularly for those with behaviours of concern and who live in an environment of concern. This presentation will cover three key human rights questions that can guide applied behaviour analysts’ work in preventing, reducing and eliminating restrictive practices.

Biography

Jeffrey Chan commenced as the Senior Practitioner, Behaviour Support on 9 July 2018. Jeff has worked in human services for nearly 30 years in government, non-government and statutory roles, in disability and health services. He was the inaugural Victorian Senior Practitioner with the responsibility of protecting the rights of people with disability subject to restrictive interventions and compulsory detention. Jeff was also Queensland’s inaugural Chief Practitioner and Director of Forensic Disability (Governor-in-Council appointment) where he was responsible for protecting the rights of people with cognitive impairment subject to restrictive practices and those in the forensic disability setting.  Prior to his current role, Jeff was Deputy CEO of the largest intellectual disability service provider in Singapore.

Jeff is an applied researcher with more than 80 publications in international refereed journals and authored several key technical reports, a partner in more than $2.5M ARC and NHMRC research grants and in his previous roles, he has commissioned and provided more than a $1M in research grants to providers and practitioners.  He serves as Associate Editor for the journal, Mindfulness, an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Positive Behavioural Support and a guest reviewer for several international journals in disability.

He is currently Adjunct Professor at the University of Queensland’s School of Education and was former Adjunct Professor at the University of Sydney’s Centre for Disability Studies.  He was also a Finalist in the Australian Human Rights Award 2010 for Community (Individual) category for his work in protecting the rights of people with disabilities subjected to restrictive interventions.

 

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Tracey Harkness

Invited Speaker

Title: NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission PBS Framework: Strengthening Practitioner Capability

Abstract

Available soon

Biography

Tracey Harkness is a registered psychologist with over 20 years of experience in the provision of positive behaviour support for people with disability who engage in behaviours of concern. Tracey has regularly provided guest lectures for Western Sydney University and University of NSW as well as training over 200 psychologists in NSW government agencies in motivational interviewing, positive behaviour support and clinical supervision. Tracey has held the positions of Practice Leader, Psychology for Ageing, Disability and Homecare and most recently was the Senior Manager of the NSW Practice Leaders team. Tracey is very passionate about the rights of people with disability to live an inclusive and valued life in the community. Tracey joins the NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission as the Director in the National Behaviour Support Team.

 

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Jessica Thomas, Ph.D.

Invited Speaker

Title: Behavioural enrichment for captive platypuses

Abstract

The platypus is one of Australia’s most iconic species, yet little is known about their basic biology because they are challenging to study in the wild. Healesville Sanctuary has been displaying platypuses since 1933 with the goal of building strong connections between the animals and visitors to encourage support for conservation. Many advances have been made to their husbandry to improve their welfare in recent years by studying their behaviour. One of these advances has been developing a goal-based behavioural enrichment program and developing human/animal relationships. The enrichment program is monitored and adjusted for each individual in the collection. Novel items such as tree fern trunks and floating logs have a high value to many individuals which encourages ‘play’ behaviours, while novel invertebrates encourages foraging. Some individuals participate in training and conditioning programs for encounters with visitors. While the animals have choice and control to participate in these encounters, we also assess their behaviour both during and after encounters to determine how this impacts their welfare.

Biography

Dr. Thomas completed a Bachelor of Science, majoring in zoology at the University of Melbourne in 2003. She went on to do a Masters of Reproductive Science at Monash University where she completed research on assisted reproductive techniques in red-tailed and brush-tailed phascogales. She has worked at Healesville Sanctuary for the last 11 years where she has spent most of that as the platypus keeper. In 2018, she completed her PhD on breeding biology of the platypus which she conducted over 6 years part-time with the aim of improving the welfare and captive breeding of platypuses.

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Sue Jaensch

Invited Speaker

Title: Applied Behaviour Analysis at Zoos Victoria - What's the Function?

Abstract

Using operant training techniques with zoo animals has long been identified as an important skill for a Zoo Keeper. Commonly zoo managers have assessed animal training programs by their outcomes, and have relied on staff who have little understanding of the science of Behaviour Analysis. This has led to a diverse approach to training, creating animal welfare concerns and needless debate amongst colleagues. As zoos across the globe continue to strive for improved welfare outcomes for the animals in their care, employing the science of Behaviour Analysis can lead to a common understanding and ensure an ethical approach to training and managing zoo animals.


Under the guidance of Dr Susan Friedman (PhD), Zoos Victoria is the first zoo in Australia to now teach and coach their Zoo Keeping staff on the theory and practical application of ABA. Sue Jaensch is one of Zoos Victoria’s Animal Training Coordinators. In her presentation, Sue will provide an insight into Zoos Victoria’s approach to animal training. She will share with us examples of how Zoos Victoria staff are applying Behaviour Analysis principles, outline some of the challenges they have faced and highlight benefits that the program has achieved.

Biography

Sue Jaensch is the Animal Training Coordinator at Healesville Sanctuary. After completing her BSc (Zoology) in 2000, Sue worked at RSPCA in a range of roles before becoming the first Animal Behaviour and Training Coordinator for RSPCA Victoria. Leaving the pet world in 2009, Sue started her career as a Zoo Keeper at Healesville Sanctuary looking after the dingoes. In 2013, she took on the role as Life Sciences Manager, working for team of 12 Zoo Keepers, before moving into her current role as Animal Training Coordinator in 2017. Sue has a Cert IV in Training and Assessment, Diploma in Frontline Management and a Graduate Certificate in Competitive Systems and Practices.